Archive for category Utah Mule Deer Hunting

Time to Apply for a Mule Deer Hunt in Utah

Posted by on Sunday, 2 March, 2014

Mule Deer Hunting Utah

The application deadline is Mar 4 2014.

Mule Deer Application Deadlines

Posted by on Thursday, 24 February, 2011

Utah                  March 3

Wyoming           March 15

New Mexico     March 28

Colorado           April 6

Nevada              April 18

Kansas              April 29

Oregon              May 15

Washington       May 26

California           June 1

Montana           June 1

Idaho                June 5

Arizona             June 8

South Dakota    July 23

Utah Deer Application Deadline

Posted by on Wednesday, 23 February, 2011

The Utah Deer Application Deadline is March 3, 2011.

Go to the “States” tab for more info.

Good Luck on the Draw

Wolves in Utah – Friend or Foe

Posted by on Wednesday, 19 January, 2011

Excerpts from the Utah DWR:

——————————————————–

Are there wolves in Utah?

Although there have been confirmed wolf sightings — and some instances of wolf-related livestock depredation — there are no known established packs in Utah.

Are wolves protected under the Endangered Species Act?

Yes. As of Aug. 5, 2010, wolves in the western United States, including all of Utah, are protected under the Endangered Species Act.

Can I kill a wolf that’s attacking my livestock?

No. Wolves are now listed as an endangered species and are fully protected under the Endangered Species Act. If wolves begin harassing or harming your livestock, contact the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS)

Will I be reimbursed if a wolf kills my livestock?

As long as wolves are protected under the Endangered Species Act, the state of Utah will not reimburse you for livestock killed by wolves. However, livestock owners may be eligible for compensation from a private organization. For details, see the Wolf Compensation Trust set up by Defenders of Wildlife.

Does Utah have a long-term plan for dealing with wolves?

In 2003, the Utah Legislature directed the DWR to prepare a wolf management plan. The DWR convened a diverse team with members from many interest groups. This effort had two main goals:

  • To encourage the USFWS to delist wolves and give management authority to the state
  • To outline how the state of Utah would manage wolves

In 2005, after an exhaustive public process, the Utah Wildlife Board and Utah Agricultural and Wildlife Damage Prevention Board approved the Utah Wolf Management Plan.

What will happen if a wolf enters Utah?

In 2010, the Utah Legislature passed legislation (see S.B. 36, Wolf Management) directing the DWR to request that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service immediately remove any wolves discovered in Utah. In compliance with the new law, the DWR sends a removal request to the USFWS each time a wolf is discovered in Utah.

What is the DWR’s position on wolves?

The DWR’s position has always been that wolves should be removed from the protection of the Endangered Species Act and be managed by the state of Utah. DWR leadership, the governor’s office and Utah’s congressional delegation have repeatedly requested that the federal government transfer management to the state. The DWR will continue urging the USFWS to delist wolves statewide. After that occurs, the DWR can implement its plan and manage wolves responsibly whenever — and wherever — they enter Utah. However, while wolves are endangered, the DWR does not have the authority to manage them, regardless of their impact on livestock or wildlife.

The DWR recognizes that unmanaged wolf populations may pose a serious threat to Utah’s wildlife. In nearby states — including Idaho, Montana and Wyoming — wildlife officials attribute declines in their elk herds to the unchecked growth of wolf packs. The DWR wants to prevent a similar situation from occurring in Utah. The DWR has a plan and personnel that can effectively manage wolves statewide.

A Magnum Buck from Utah’s Henry Mountains

Posted by on Wednesday, 8 December, 2010

Terri Hunt, a Utah resident killed this buck on the Henry Mountians in 2010

Photo submitted by Paul Baxter

Whopper Deseret Buck

Posted by on Wednesday, 24 November, 2010

Deseret Land and Livestock and the surrounding area was once a premier locale for monster buck mule deer. This year, after many years of decline, a good one has surfaced:

Submitted by Paul Baxter

Utah changes affecting Deer Hunters

Posted by on Wednesday, 3 March, 2010

Utah has extended the application period to March 8 due to computer problems.

For 2010 Utah is not requiring archery hunters to choose a region.

A hunting license is required before you may apply to hunt deer via the draw. Ditto bonus and preference points.  The price for a non-resident license is $65.  The price for a general tag is $263. The price for limited entry is $463 and for premium limited entry – $563.

If you hunt deer you will probably be required to report online within 30 days. If you fail to do so, you will be assessed a $50 late fee the next time you apply.

Rifle deer hunts for 2010 are limited to five days, and in some cases three days.

Utah is making available permits called management buck permits to get rid of 3-points and under. Beware, you lose your bonus points on these hunts.

Utah Deer Tag Drawing

Posted by on Thursday, 28 January, 2010

This year you may apply for a Utah deer hunt beginning February 1 and ending on March 1. If you are applying for points only you have until March 8th. You may apply online by clicking here: UTAH DEER APPLICATION Good Luck

Utah Prices

Posted by on Wednesday, 13 January, 2010
Game licenses
Permit or license Rate
Resident basic hunting license (13 and younger) $11.00
Resident basic hunting license (14 and older) $26.00
Resident combination $30.00
Nonresident combination license $80.00
Resident Dedicated Hunter, 3-yr. (12–17) $105.00
Resident Dedicated Hunter, 3-yr. (age 18+) $180.00
Lifetime license Dedicated Hunter, 3-yr. (12–17) $37.50
Lifetime license Dedicated Hunter, 3-yr. (age 18+) $75.00
Nonresident basic hunting license $65.00
Nonresident small game, 3-day $25.00
Nonresident Dedicated Hunter, (12–17), includes season fishing license $799.00
Nonresident Dedicated Hunter, (age 18+), includes season fishing license $1,032.00
Nonresident falconry meet $15.00
General big game season permits
Permit or license Rate
Resident general season deer $35.00
Resident antlerless deer $25.00
Resident two-doe antlerless $40.00
Resident depredation-deer-antlerless $25.00
Resident landowner mitigation
Deer: antlerless $25.00
Elk: antlerless $45.00
Pronghorn: doe $20.00
Nonresident landowner mitigation
Deer: antlerless $88.00
Elk: antlerless $213.00
Pronghorn: doe $135.00
Nonresident general season deer, includes season fishing license $263.00
Nonresident extended hunt archery auxiliary deer permit-with valid deer license $20.00
Nonresident depredation-deer-antlerless $88.00
Nonresident antlerless deer $88.00
Nonresident two-doe antlerless $166.00
Limited-entry game permits
Permit or license Rate
Deer
Resident limited-entry $75.00
Resident premium limited-entry deer $163.00
Resident CWMU buck deer $35.00
Resident CWMU limited-entry deer $75.00
Resident CWMU premium limited-entry deer $163.00
Resident CWMU antlerless deer $25.00
Resident CWMU two-doe antlerless deer $40.00
Nonresident limited-entry deer, includes season fishing license $463.00
Nonresident premium limited-entry deer, includes season fishing license $563.00
Nonresident CWMU buck deer, includes season fishing license $263.00
Nonresident CWMU limited-entry deer, includes season fishing license $463.00
Nonresident CWMU premium limited-entry deer, includes season fishing license $563.00
Nonresident CWMU anterless deer $88.00
Nonresident CWMU two-doe antlerless deer $166.00

Something to Behold

Posted by on Friday, 20 November, 2009

A beautiful Henry Mountain Buck: